Automotive Technician

Automotive Technology

The Anoka Technical College Automotive Technician program offers two awards: an associate of applied science (AAS) degree, a 71-credit program, and a diploma.

Both programs include technical and general education component. 

Automotive Technician students may graduate in as little as two years and find employment in a variety of settings such as new or used car dealerships, government or private fleets, national chains and smaller local shops. Some graduates choose to open their own repair shops.

The Anoka Technical College Automotive Technician associate of applied science (AAS) degree is a 71-credit program that includes technical and general education components.

This degree provides the skills for trade entry plus the possibility to pursue a bachelor of arts (BA) degree with cooperating colleges and universities.

PDF Program Guide

Prequisites

Students must be 18 years old for the Automotive program due to the internship requirements, so that the automotive shop sites can insure you.

Students must also possess a current valid driver’s license.

The required math and English courses may have prerequisites depending on your Accuplacer assessment score.

AUTO1000 level courses do not require a prerequisite. AUTO2000 level courses require AUTO1010 and AUTO1166 or instructor approval as prerequisites, or they must be taken concurrently with other courses.

Also see Graduation Requirements.

Tools of the Trade

Check out the tools students learn to use:

  • Electrical and Electronic Diagnostic Equipment: Digital Multi-Meters (DMM’s); General Motors’ Tech 1 and Tech 2 scan tools; Ford’s Next Generation Scan tool (NGS); Chrysler’s DRB-III scan tool; SPX/OTC
  • Genisys scan tools; digital storage and live oscilloscopes; battery “capacitance testers”; battery, starter, and charging system testers; chassis ear electronic listening device; wheel balancing and four wheel alignment equipment; air conditioning refrigerant recovery; recycling and recharging stations
  • Pressure indicators: fuel pressure testers; air conditioning manifold pressure gauges;intake manifold vacuum gauges; oil pressure gauges; tire pressure gauges
  • Bearing pullers and presses: ball joint separators; bearing pullers; gear puller tools; slide hammers
  • Specialty wrenches: alignment wrenches; chain wrenches; locking wrenches; lug wrenches
  • Trim or molding tools: carbon scrapers; gasket scrapers; scrapers
  • Precision measuring tools: feeler gauges; inside and outside micrometers; vernier calipers; depth gauges; small bore gauges; cylinder taper gauges; torque wrenches

Technology

Check out the cutting-edge technology students have access to: Analytical or scientific software: updateable software used in all of the scan tools and electronic four wheel alignment equipment mentioned above

Electronic vehicle service information retrieval: AllData; Mitchell OnDemand 5; General Motors Electronic Service Information (ESI)

Vehicle service and repair estimating software: Mitchell OnDemand 5

Credits

  TOTAL CREDITS
71
 Technical Education
53
 AUTO1010  General Automotive Service
2
 AUTO1166  Vehicle Electronics
3
 AUTO2005  Supervised Internship I
2
 AUTO2006  Supervised Internship II
2
 AUTO2007  Supervised Internship III
2
 AUTO2113  Engine Repair and Service
5
 AUTO2123  Automatic Transmission Condition
5
 AUTO2135  Manual Drive Train System and Service
4
 AUTO2145  Suspension and Steering System Service
4
 AUTO2155  Brake System and Service
5
 AUTO2164  Chassis Electrical Systems
3
 AUTO2166  Starting and Charging Systems
2
 AUTO2175  Automotive Climate Control
4
 AUTO2183  Fuel and Ignition Management Systems
6
 AUTO2187  Automotive Computer Systems and Drive-Ability
4
 
 General Eduaction/MnTC Requirements
18
Eighteen general education credits of Minnesota Transfer Curriculum (MnTC) are required.
 ENGL1105  Composition I
4
 MATH1500  Mathematical Ideas
3
 PSYC1505  General Psychology
4
 SOSC2000  Sociology of Work
4
 SPCH1200  Interpersonal Communications
3

Program Sequence

 FIRST YEAR
 Fall Semester   
  Lecture/Lab 
 AUTO1010  General Automotive Service 2  1/1
 AUTO1166  Vehicle Electronics 3  1/2
 AUTO2145  Suspension and Steering System Service 4  1/3
 AUTO2155  Brake System and Service 5  1/4
 *SOSC2000  Sociology of Work 4  4/0
       
 TOTAL   18  
  
Spring Semester   
  Lecture/Lab 
 AUTO2005  Supervised Internship I 2  0/2
 AUTO2164  Chassis Electrical Systems 3  1/2
 AUTO2164  Chassis Electrical Systems 3  1/2
 AUTO2166  Starting and Charging Systems 2  1/1
 AUTO2183  Fuel and Ignition Management Systems 6  2/4
 *SPCH1200  Interpersonal Communications 3  3/0
       
 TOTAL   16  
  
 SECOND YEAR
 Fall Semester   
  Lecture/Lab 
 AUTO2006  Supervised Internship II 2  0/2
 AUTO2113  Engine Repair and Service 5  2/3
 AUTO2123  Automatic Transmission Condition 5  2/3
 *MATH1500  Mathematical Ideas 3  3/0
 *PSYC1505  General Psychology 4  4/0
       
 TOTAL   19  
  
 Spring Semester   
  Lecture/Lab 
 AUTO2007  Supervised Internship III 2  0/2
 AUTO2135  Manual Drive Train System and Service 4  1/3
 AUTO2175  Automotive Climate Control 4  1/3
 AUTO2187  Automotive Computer Systems and Drive-Ability 4  1/3
 *ENGL1105  Composition I 4  4/0
       
 TOTAL   18  

Although the general education courses are listed in the sequence above, the courses may be taken any semester and in any order.

*Some substitutions may be available for the recommended general education courses. Please consult with your program advisor before registering for any general education courses not listed above.

Required Tool List

2013-2014 Required Tool List
  • ¼” Drive Socket Set w/ Ratchet & Extensions 6 pt. 3/16” to 9/16” Std & Deep
  • ¼” Drive Sockets 6 pt. 5.5 to 13mm Std & Deep
  • 3/8” Drive Socket Set w/ Ratchet & U Joint6 pt. 3/8” to 13/16”
  • 3/8” Drive Extensions 3”, 6”, 18”, & 24” long
  • 3/8” Drive Sockets-6 pt. 8 to 19mm
  • 3/8” Drive Deep Sockets 6 pt. 3/8” to 13/16”
  • 3/8” Drive Deep Sockets-6 pt. 8 to 19mm
  • 3/8” or ½” Drive Medium or Deep Impact Swivel Sockets-6 pt. 10 to 19mm
  • 3/8” Drive ¼” Hex Bit Driver
  • 3/8” Drive 5/16” Hex Bit Driver
  • 3/8” Drive 3/8” Hex Bit Driver
  • 3/8” Drive 8mm Hex Bit Driver
  • 3/8” Drive Internal Torx Driver Set (including T40, T45, T47, T50,T55, & T60)
  • 3/8” Drive External Torx Driver Set (E4 to E12)
  • 3/8” Drive Spark Plug Socket (13/16”)
  • 3/8” Drive Spark Plug Socket (5/8”)
  • ¼” to 3/8” Drive Adapter
  • 3/8” to ¼” Drive Adapter
  • 3/8” to ½” Drive Adapter
  • ½” to 3/8” Drive Adapter
  • ½” Drive Breaker Bar 24”
  • ½” Drive Extensions 3” & 6”
  • ½” Drive Ratcheting 150 ft. lb. Split Beam Style Click Torque Wrench
  • Combination Wrench Set-¼” to 1”
  • Flare Nut Wrench Set-3/8” to 13/16”
  • Combination Wrench Set-6 to 22mm
  • Flare Nut Wrench Set-9 to 19mm
  • Hex Wrench Set-Standard
  • Hex Wrench Set-Metric
  • Side Terminal Battery Wrench-Ratcheting
  • Battery Cable Clamp Puller
  • Battery Top Terminal Cleaner w/ Spring Steel cutting blades and brush for side terminals
  • 9 volt Battery Powered Memory Saver
  • Feeler Gauge-Standard-.0015”-.025”minimum
  • Feeler Gauge-Metric-.05 –1.0mmminimum
  • Sparkplug Gap Gauge (Wire styleONLY)
  • Screwdriver Set (8 piece minimum) Standard & Phillips
  • Torx Screwdriver Set T10 to T30 minimum
  • 2-Pocket Screwdrivers-1 Straight & 1 Phillips Blades
  • 18-24” Angled Pry Bar with Handle
  • Fender Cover-2
  • 3 or 4 lb. Hand Drilling Hammer
  • 24 oz. Ball Peen Hammer
  • Rubber Mallet
  • Pliers 8”minimum
  • Side Cutter Pliers (not Line-mans Pliers) 8”minimum
  • Adjustable Arc Joint Pliers 12” minimum
  • Needle Nose Pliers 8”
  • Vise Grip Pliers 8-10”
  • Wire Stripper/Cutter/Crimping Pliers
  • 10” minimum Mill File & Handle
  • Punch and Chisel Set (Pin, Starting & Center)
  • Gasket Scraper
  • Tire Pressure Gauge
  • Tire Air Chuck w/ Milton Type A #777 Quick Connect Air Nipple
  • TPM Compliant Torque Limiting Schrader Valve Core Tool
  • Antifreeze Tester
  • LED Trouble Light
  • LED Penlight
  • KD2756 Electronic Ignition Spark Tester, Spark Plug w/ Grounding Clip ONLY (No Adjustable Gap
  • Spark Testers)
  • 2” minimum Inspection Mirror
  • HD Magnetic Pick-up Tool
  • Magnetic Parts Tray
  • 6” Pocket Rule
  • Scribe-Straight & 90°
  • Universal Door Panel Removal Tool
  • Oil Filter Wrench-Small
  • Oil Filter Wrench-Large
  • Brake Star Wheel Adjustment Tool
  • Brake Shoe Spring Tool (KD280 or equivalent, NOT Brake Spring Pliers)
  • Universal Brake Hold Down Spring Tool (KD2774 or equivalent)
  • ½” Drive Impact Wrench w/ Milton Type A #777 Quick Connect Air Nipple
  • ½” Drive 6 pt. Impact Socket Set 7/16” to 1”
  • ½” Drive 6 pt. Impact Socket Set 13 to 27mm
  • Blow Gun-OSHA Approved w/ Milton Type A #777 Quick Connect Air Nipple
  • 12 Volt Incandescent Test Light/Circuit Tester (NO LED test lights)
  • Fluke 88-5/A-Automotive Digital Multimeter Kit with Storage Box, Deluxe Lead
  • Set, & Accessories(Fluke Model 88-V or 88-5 ONLY, no earlier versions)
  • Bed of Nails Style Alligator Clip-Red
  • Ear Protection Headphone style with over the ear muffs
  • 1 pair Clear ANSI Z87.1 approved Safety Glasses
  • Tool Storage Roller Cabinet (48” wide MAX) 

Graduation Requirements

All Anoka Technical College students must demonstrate basic competency in Math, English, and Reading. Competency may be demonstrated through achieving minimum cut scores in new student assessments (Accuplacer); through other assessment exemptions; or through successful completion of Basic Math, Basic English, and Reading courses, earning a “C” or higher before receiving a diploma or an associate in applied science degree.

Also see graduation standards in Anoka Technical College Student Handbook.

NOTE: Program plans are subject to change. Please contact your program advisor for the most current program information.

Transfer Opportunities

To see how this program transfers to other programs, review the Anoka Tech articulation agreements at Minnesota Transfer. Articulation agreements are transfer agreements with specific programs and partnering schools. These agreements detail how specific courses transfer to a specific program at the partnering school. For a complete list of Anoka Tech’s articulation agreements listed by program please see this Minnesota Transfer link.

This program may also include Minnesota Transfer Curriculum (MnTC) courses. MnTC courses transfer to meet MnTC general education courses throughout the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities (MnSCU) system. MnTC courses from Anoka Technical College transfer to any MnSCU institution to meet the same goal areas that are met at Anoka Tech.

Students are encouraged to contact the Office of Records and Registration at all transfer schools for details about the institution’s transfer process and policies.

For more information please visit our Transfer page

Industry Information

Technicians determine serviceability, find specifications and service procedures in manuals and technical literature, repair or replace parts, provide repair estimates, and communicate with customers and trade personnel.

The ability to make a quick and accurate diagnosis is one of the technician’s most valuable skills. It requires good reasoning ability, as well as a thorough knowledge of automobiles.

Technicians may be required to determine serviceability, find specifications and service procedures in manuals and technical literature, repair or replace parts, give estimates of repair, and communicate with customers and trade personnel.

Most technicians perform a variety of repairs; however, some specialize. Areas of specialization may include chassis service, drive train service, engine overhaul, fuel delivery and electrical system service, and air conditioning service. Other related areas may include merchandising, service/sales, and manufacturing representatives.

 

Wages/Outlook/Advancement

Beginners who learn on the job usually start as trainees or mechanics’ helpers. Within a few months, they perform many routine service tasks and make simple repairs. It usually takes two to five years of on-the-job training to become a journey-level mechanic. This means that a mechanic is skilled enough to perform difficult repairs. However, graduates of college training programs are often able to advance to the journey level after only a few months on the job.

With an additional year of training, journey-level mechanics can specialize in a difficult area, such as transmission repair. However, they can specialize in areas that do not require all-around knowledge of auto repair in less time.

Experienced mechanics with leadership ability sometimes advance to shop supervisor or service manager. Those who work well with customers may become service estimators. Some open their own repair shops.

Careers in the installation, maintenance and repair fields overall are projected to increase 15% from 2010-2020.

According to research by Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED), there are nearly 400 motor vehicle, service and parts dealership establishments located throughout the broader 13-county Central Minnesota region, and even more establishments in the Metro region which includes Anoka, Hennepin and Ramsey counties.

Wage information is available from the Minnesota Department of Education and the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development

Faculty

Each faculty member has hands-on, industry repair experience, factory training and certification, and current ASE certifications in steering and suspensions systems including four-wheel alignment, brake systems and drive trains (automatic and manual transmissions). Students learn about complete engine repair including overhauls, fuel, ignition, and emission control systems, heating ventilation and air conditioning systems, and electrical and complete vehicle electronic system service and repair.

Program Advisors
John Johnson
763-576-4852

David Larson
763-576-4862

Dave Holmquist
763-67-4700

 

The Anoka Technical College Automotive Technician diploma is a 60-credit program that includes technical and general education components.

The diploma transfers into the associate of applied science (AAS) degree, provides the skills for trade entry as well as the possibility to pursue a bachelor of arts (BA) degree with cooperating colleges and universities.

PDF Program Guide

Prequisites

Students must be 18 years old for the automotive program due to the internship requirements, so that the automotive shop sites can insure you.

Students must also possess a current valid driver’s license.

The required math and English courses may have prerequisites depending on your Accuplacer assessment score.

AUTO1000 level courses do not require a prerequisite. AUTO2000 level courses require AUTO1010 and AUTO1166 or instructor approval as prerequisites or taken concurrently with other courses.

Also see Graduation Requirements.

Tools of the Trade

Check out the tools students learn to use:

Electrical and Electronic Diagnostic Equipment: Digital Multi-Meters (DMM’s); General Motors’ Tech 1 and Tech 2 scan tools; Ford’s Next Generation Scan tool (NGS); Chrysler’s DRB-III scan tool; SPX/OTC

Genisys scan tools; digital storage and live oscilloscopes; battery “capacitance testers”; battery, starter, and charging system testers; chassis ear electronic listening device; wheel balancing and four wheel alignment equipment; air conditioning refrigerant recovery; recycling and recharging stations

Pressure indicators: fuel pressure testers; air conditioning manifold pressure gauges;intake manifold vacuum gauges; oil pressure gauges; tire pressure gauges

Bearing pullers and presses: ball joint separators; bearing pullers; gear puller tools; slide hammers

Specialty wrenches: alignment wrenches; chain wrenches; locking wrenches; lug wrenches

Trim or molding tools: carbon scrapers; gasket scrapers; scrapers

Precision measuring tools: feeler gauges; inside and outside micrometers; vernier calipers; depth gauges; small bore gauges; cylinder taper gauges; torque wrenches

Technology

Check out the cutting-edge technology students have access to: Analytical or scientific software: updateable software used in all of the scan tools and electronic four wheel alignment equipment mentioned above

Electronic vehicle service information retrieval: AllData; Mitchell OnDemand 5; General Motors Electronic Service Information (ESI)

Vehicle service and repair estimating software: Mitchell OnDemand 5

Credits

 TOTAL CREDITS
 60
 Technical Education
53
 AUTO1010  General Automotive Service
2
 AUTO1166  Vehicle Electronics
3
 AUTO2005  Supervised Internship I
2
 AUTO2006  Supervised Internship II
2
 AUTO2007  Supervised Internship III
2
 AUTO2113  Engine Repair and Service
5
 AUTO2123  Automatic Transmission Condition
5
 AUTO2135  Manual Drive Train System and Service
4
 AUTO2145  Suspension and Steering System Service
4
 AUTO2155  Brake System and Service
5
 AUTO2164  Chassis Electrical Systems
3
 AUTO2166  Starting and Charging Systems
2
 AUTO2175  Automotive Climate Control
4
 AUTO2183  Fuel and Ignition Management Systems
6
 AUTO2187  Automotive Computer Systems and Drive-Ability
4
 
 General Eduaction/MnTC Requirements
7

Eighteen (18) general education credits of Minnesota Transfer Curriculum (MnTC) are required.

Please set up an appointment and meet with your Program Advisor to identify required General Education Courses prior to registration.

Program Sequence

 FIRST YEAR
 Fall Semester   
 
Lecture/Lab 
 AUTO1010  General Automotive Service
2
1/1
 AUTO1166  Vehicle Electronics
3
1/2
 AUTO2145  Suspension and Steering System Service
4
1/4
 AUTO2155  Brake System and Service
5
1/3
 *MnTC/General Education Course
   
 TOTAL  
14
 
Spring Semester   
 
Lecture/Lab 
 AUTO2005  Supervised Internship I
2
0/2
 AUTO2164  Chassis Electrical Systems
3
1/2
 AUTO2166  Starting and Charging Systems
2
1/1
 AUTO2183  Fuel and Ignition Management Systems
6
2/4
 *MnTC/General Education Course
   
 TOTAL  
13
  
 SECOND YEAR
 Fall Semester   
 
Lecture/Lab 
 AUTO2006  Supervised Internship II
2
0/2
 AUTO2113  Engine Repair and Service
5
2/3
 AUTO2123  Transmission Condition
5
2/3
 *MnTC/General Education Course    
       
 TOTAL   12  
 
 Spring Semester   
 
Lecture/Lab 
 AUTO2007  Supervised Internship III
2
0/2
 AUTO2135  Manual Drive Train System and Service
4
1/3
 AUTO2175  Automotive Climate Control
4
1/3
 AUTO2187  Automotive Computer Systems and Drive-Ability
4
1/3
 *MnTC/General Education Course
   
 TOTAL  
 14
 
Although the general education courses are listed in the sequence above, the courses may be taken any semester and in any order.

*Seven general education credits are required to earn a diploma as an Automotive Technician. Please set up an appointment and meet with your program advisor to identify required general education courses prior to registration.

Tool List

2013-2014 Required Tool List
  • ¼” Drive Socket Set w/ Ratchet & Extensions 6 pt. 3/16” to 9/16” Std & Deep
  • ¼” Drive Sockets 6 pt. 5.5 to 13mm Std & Deep
  • 3/8” Drive Socket Set w/ Ratchet & U Joint6 pt. 3/8” to 13/16”
  • 3/8” Drive Extensions 3”, 6”, 18”, & 24” long
  • 3/8” Drive Sockets-6 pt. 8 to 19mm
  • 3/8” Drive Deep Sockets 6 pt. 3/8” to 13/16”
  • 3/8” Drive Deep Sockets-6 pt. 8 to 19mm
  • 3/8” or ½” Drive Medium or Deep Impact Swivel Sockets-6 pt. 10 to 19mm
  • 3/8” Drive ¼” Hex Bit Driver
  • 3/8” Drive 5/16” Hex Bit Driver
  • 3/8” Drive 3/8” Hex Bit Driver
  • 3/8” Drive 8mm Hex Bit Driver
  • 3/8” Drive Internal Torx Driver Set (including T40, T45, T47, T50,T55, & T60)
  • 3/8” Drive External Torx Driver Set (E4 to E12)
  • 3/8” Drive Spark Plug Socket (13/16”)
  • 3/8” Drive Spark Plug Socket (5/8”)
  • ¼” to 3/8” Drive Adapter
  • 3/8” to ¼” Drive Adapter
  • 3/8” to ½” Drive Adapter
  • ½” to 3/8” Drive Adapter
  • ½” Drive Breaker Bar 24”
  • ½” Drive Extensions 3” & 6”
  • ½” Drive Ratcheting 150 ft. lb. Split Beam Style Click Torque Wrench
  • Combination Wrench Set-¼” to 1”
  • Flare Nut Wrench Set-3/8” to 13/16”
  • Combination Wrench Set-6 to 22mm
  • Flare Nut Wrench Set-9 to 19mm
  • Hex Wrench Set-Standard
  • Hex Wrench Set-Metric
  • Side Terminal Battery Wrench-Ratcheting
  • Battery Cable Clamp Puller
  • Battery Top Terminal Cleaner w/ Spring Steel cutting blades and brush for side terminals
  • 9 volt Battery Powered Memory Saver
  • Feeler Gauge-Standard-.0015”-.025”minimum
  • Feeler Gauge-Metric-.05 –1.0mmminimum
  • Sparkplug Gap Gauge (Wire styleONLY)
  • Screwdriver Set (8 piece minimum) Standard & Phillips
  • Torx Screwdriver Set T10 to T30 minimum
  • 2-Pocket Screwdrivers-1 Straight & 1 Phillips Blades
  • 18-24” Angled Pry Bar with Handle
  • Fender Cover-2
  • 3 or 4 lb. Hand Drilling Hammer
  • 24 oz. Ball Peen Hammer
  • Rubber Mallet
  • Pliers 8”minimum
  • Side Cutter Pliers (not Line-mans Pliers) 8”minimum
  • Adjustable Arc Joint Pliers 12” minimum
  • Needle Nose Pliers 8”
  • Vise Grip Pliers 8-10”
  • Wire Stripper/Cutter/Crimping Pliers
  • 10” minimum Mill File & Handle
  • Punch and Chisel Set (Pin, Starting & Center)
  • Gasket Scraper
  • Tire Pressure Gauge
  • Tire Air Chuck w/ Milton Type A #777 Quick Connect Air Nipple
  • TPM Compliant Torque Limiting Schrader Valve Core Tool
  • Antifreeze Tester
  • LED Trouble Light
  • LED Penlight
  • KD2756 Electronic Ignition Spark Tester, Spark Plug w/ Grounding Clip ONLY (No Adjustable Gap
  • Spark Testers)
  • 2” minimum Inspection Mirror
  • HD Magnetic Pick-up Tool
  • Magnetic Parts Tray
  • 6” Pocket Rule
  • Scribe-Straight & 90°
  • Universal Door Panel Removal Tool
  • Oil Filter Wrench-Small
  • Oil Filter Wrench-Large
  • Brake Star Wheel Adjustment Tool
  • Brake Shoe Spring Tool (KD280 or equivalent, NOT Brake Spring Pliers)
  • Universal Brake Hold Down Spring Tool (KD2774 or equivalent)
  • ½” Drive Impact Wrench w/ Milton Type A #777 Quick Connect Air Nipple
  • ½” Drive 6 pt. Impact Socket Set 7/16” to 1”
  • ½” Drive 6 pt. Impact Socket Set 13 to 27mm
  • Blow Gun-OSHA Approved w/ Milton Type A #777 Quick Connect Air Nipple
  • 12 Volt Incandescent Test Light/Circuit Tester (NO LED test lights)
  • Fluke 88-5/A-Automotive Digital Multimeter Kit with Storage Box, Deluxe Lead
  • Set, & Accessories(Fluke Model 88-V or 88-5 ONLY, no earlier versions)
  • Bed of Nails Style Alligator Clip-Red
  • Ear Protection Headphone style with over the ear muffs
  • 1 pair Clear ANSI Z87.1 approved Safety Glasses
  • Tool Storage Roller Cabinet (48” wide MAX) 

Graduation Requirements

All Anoka Technical College students must demonstrate basic competency in Math, English, and Reading. Competency may be demonstrated through achieving minimum cut scores in new student assessments (Accuplacer); through other assessment exemptions; or through successful completion of Basic Math, Basic English, and Reading courses, earning a “C” or higher before receiving a diploma or an associate in applied science degree.

Also see graduation standards in Anoka Technical College Student Handbook.

NOTE: Program plans are subject to change. Please contact your program advisor for the most current program information.

Transfer Opportunities

To see how this program transfers to other programs, review the Anoka Tech articulation agreements at Minnesota Transfer. Articulation agreements are transfer agreements with specific programs and partnering schools. These agreements detail how specific courses transfer to a specific program at the partnering school. For a complete list of Anoka Tech’s articulation agreements listed by program please see this Minnesota Transfer link.

This program may also include Minnesota Transfer Curriculum (MnTC) courses. MnTC courses transfer to meet MnTC general education courses throughout the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities (MnSCU) system. MnTC courses from Anoka Technical College transfer to any MnSCU institution to meet the same goal areas that are met at Anoka Tech.

Students are encouraged to contact the Office of Records and Registration at all transfer schools for details about the institution’s transfer process and policies.

For more information please visit our Transfer page

Industry Information

Technicians determine serviceability, find specifications and service procedures in manuals and technical literature, repair or replace parts, provide repair estimates, and communicate with customers and trade personnel.

The ability to make a quick and accurate diagnosis is one of the technician’s most valuable skills. It requires good reasoning ability, as well as a thorough knowledge of automobiles.

Technicians may be required to determine serviceability, find specifications and service procedures in manuals and technical literature, repair or replace parts, give estimates of repair, and communicate with customers and trade personnel.

Most technicians perform a variety of repairs; however, some specialize. Areas of specialization may include chassis service, drive train service, engine overhaul, fuel delivery and electrical system service, and air conditioning service. Other related areas may include merchandising, service/sales, and manufacturing representatives.

 

Wages/Outlook/Advancement

Beginners who learn on the job usually start as trainees or mechanics’ helpers. Within a few months, they perform many routine service tasks and make simple repairs. It usually takes two to five years of on-the-job training to become a journey-level mechanic. This means that a mechanic is skilled enough to perform difficult repairs. However, graduates of college training programs are often able to advance to the journey level after only a few months on the job.

With an additional year of training, journey-level mechanics can specialize in a difficult area, such as transmission repair. However, they can specialize in areas that do not require all-around knowledge of auto repair in less time.

Experienced mechanics with leadership ability sometimes advance to shop supervisor or service manager. Those who work well with customers may become service estimators. Some open their own repair shops.

Careers in the installation, maintenance and repair fields overall are projected to increase 15% from 2010-2020.

According to research by Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED), there are nearly 400 motor vehicle, service and parts dealership establishments located throughout the broader 13-county Central Minnesota region, and even more establishments in the Metro region which includes Anoka, Hennepin and Ramsey counties.

Wage information is available from the Minnesota Department of Education and the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development

Gainful Employment Report

Faculty

Each faculty member has hands-on, industry repair experience, factory training and certification, and current ASE certifications in steering and suspensions systems including four-wheel alignment, brake systems and drive trains (automatic and manual transmissions). Students learn about complete engine repair including overhauls, fuel, ignition, and emission control systems, heating ventilation and air conditioning systems, and electrical and complete vehicle electronic system service and repair.

John Johnson
763-576-4700

David Larson
763-576-4700

Dave Holmquist
763-576-4700

 

Careers in the installation, maintenance and repair fields overall are projected to increase 15% from 2010-2020. According to research by Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED).

Here are sample careers, growth expected and salaries in the metropolitan area and throughout Minnesota.

 Job Title

Percent Change in Employment 2010-2020 Twin Cities Minnesota
Median Wage per hour (2012)
Automotive Service Technician and Mechanics 12.4% $18.99 $17.47
Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Occupations  15.2% $21.35 $20.59
Supervisors of Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Workers 10.4% $30.74 $29.86
Motorcycle Mechanics  14.9% $17.09 $16.43
Outdoor Power Equipment and Other Small Engine Mechanics  18.4% $17.06 $16.77
Recreational Vehicle Service Technicians 14.6% $18.55 $17.14
Vehicle and Mobile Equipment Mechanics,Installers   13.5% $21.04 $19.58

 Source: Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED)



Start

Fall: August

Awards

Degree
Diploma

Delivery

Day

Contact

John Johnson
763-576-4067

David Larson
763-576-4019

“As a country, we are extremely reliant on our personal vehicles. Automotive Technicians are cultural heroes in a sense, coming to the rescue of people stranded by their vehicle. There will always be jobs in our country for people with good automotive repair skills.”